Carninje

Origin of name:

Carninje is named to honour the Carninje Balug People of the Wathaurong or Burrumbeet tribe. Their clan area is around Linton, west of Mt Buninyong.

Known since:

She was first seen on 30 November 2011 as a mature, breeding female koala. She was seen on a regular basis until January 2014, then disappeared for four years.

older female koala

Carninje in 2012. She would have been around 4 or 5 years old at this time.

Her daughter Moijerre stayed in her mother’s old home range until December 2014, then she disappeared as well.

Carninje re-appeared as an older female koala, near her old home range, in December 2018.

older female koala

Carninje in 2018. She has to be at least 10 years old, possibly more

How often seen:

In summer 2018/2019 she has been seen 10+ times, but she only re-appeared in December.

Family:

Carninje had joey Keyeet (f) in 2011, and Moijerre (f) late in 2012. Their fathers were probably Winberry, but we don’t have enough information to be confident.

older female koala with joey

Carninje with joey Keyeet, in 2011

Neighbours:

When she lived in our area she shared her home range with her daughter Moijerre, male Winberry. Female Worinyaloke lived nearby.

Now she is neighbours with Ngardang & Bunyip, KiKi & Lulu and Lakorra. Gulkurguli and Winberry are the closest males.

Interesting notes:

When she disappeared she looked thin, and we were concerned about her. We had no idea why she had left, or even if she’d died. To see her again as an older female koala in 2018 is a joy. She is at least 10 years old, possibly 12.

How do we have so much information about Carninje?

Echidna Walkabout’s Wild Koala Research Project has been monitoring the koalas of the You Yangs and Brisbane Ranges for 20 years. In 1998 we discovered a non-intrusive method of identifying koalas by their natural nose patterns. Since then we have been collecting data during tours, and using it to advocate for koalas, plant trees where they are most needed, and remove weeds to improve koala habitat.

All our tourists play an important part in this research, by making it possible through funding this social enterprise, and by looking out for koalas on our tours.

10 year old female koala

Carninje in 2018

Learn more:

Conservation

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